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The student news site of Colonia High School

The Declaration

The student news site of Colonia High School

The Declaration

In the workforce, how young is too young

Stocking+shelves+at+Fresh+Grocer%2C+Daniella+Albuquerue%2C+16%2C+is+only+allowed+to+work+a+few+hours+at+her+job+in+New+Jersey+due+to+child+labor+laws.
Photo Credit: Photo with permission by Daniella Albuquerue
Stocking shelves at Fresh Grocer, Daniella Albuquerue, 16, is only allowed to work a few hours at her job in New Jersey due to child labor laws.

­Child labor is a practice that has long been a concern in many societies. The exploitation of children for economic gain has been condemned for years, leading to the development of child labor laws. However, these laws vary from state to state.

Florida

Child labor laws in Florida are regulated by the state’s Department of Business and Professional Regulation, Division of Labor Standards. These laws exist to protect the health, safety, and well-being of children, and to ensure that their education is not compromised by employment. In Florida, children under the age of 14 are generally prohibited from working, with some exceptions for newspaper delivery, babysitting, and agricultural work. Children between the ages of 14 and 17 may work, but there are restrictions on the hours they can work and the types of jobs they can do.

Florida Restrictions

The specific restrictions for individuals aged 14-17 include: That during the school year, they may not work more than 3 hours on a school day or more than 8 hours on a non-school day. They may also not work before 6:30 a.m. or after 11 p.m. on a school night, or before 6:30 a.m. or after 12:30 a.m. on a non-school night. They may not work more than 18 hours in a school week or more than 30 hours in a non-school week. Lastly, they may not work in hazardous occupations, such as operating power-driven machinery or working in construction. Employers who violate child labor laws in Florida can be fined and may face other penalties.

California

Child labor laws in California are designed to protect children under the age of 18 from exploitation in the workplace. These laws establish minimum age requirements for employment, restrict the types of jobs that minors can perform, and limit the number of hours that minors can work.

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California Restrictions

Minimum Age: Children under the age of 14 are generally not allowed to work in California, with a few exceptions, such as performing in the entertainment industry. Minors aged 14 and 15 can work, but only under certain conditions, such as obtaining a work permit and limiting the hours they work. Working Hours: Those aged 16 and 17 can work up to eight hours per day and up to 48 hours per week. However, they cannot work more than six consecutive days without a day off. Hazardous Jobs: Minors are prohibited from working in certain hazardous occupations, such as mining, manufacturing explosives, or operating certain types of machinery. Education: Employers must provide minors with time off for school and may not employ them during school hours. Work Permits: Minors aged 14 and 15 are required to obtain a work permit before they can begin working.

New Jersey

In New Jersey, child labor laws are designed to protect the health, safety, and welfare of children who are employed or seeking employment. The laws establish age restrictions, hours of work, and working conditions for minors. Some key points about child labor laws in New Jersey: The minimum age for employment is 14, with some exceptions for 11- and 12-year-old’s who are employed in certain types of work, such as babysitting or delivering newspapers. Minors between the ages of 14 and 18 must obtain a work permit before beginning employment. As well as not being able to work with explosives and in coal mines.

New Jersey Summer and School Day Restrictions

During the school year, 16 and 17 years old can work a maximum of 28 hours per week, and 8 hours per day. During the summer months and school breaks, 16 and 17 years old can work a maximum of 40 hours per week, and no more than 8 hours per day. 14 and 15 years old can work a maximum of 18 hours per week during the school year, and 3 hours per day on school days, and can work a maximum of 40 hours per week during the summer and school breaks, and no more than 8 hours per day. 16 and 17 years old can work until 11:30 p.m. on school nights, and until 1:00 a.m. on non-school nights. Also, 14 and 15 years old can work until 7:00 p.m. on school nights, and until 9:00 p.m. on non-school nights.

North Carolina

In North Carolina, children under the age of 14 are generally prohibited from working, with a few exceptions such as working as newspaper carriers or performers. Children aged 14 and 15 are allowed to work, but there are restrictions on the number of hours they can work and the types of jobs they can perform.

North Carolina Restrictions

During the school year, they can work a maximum of three hours per day and 18 hours per week. When school is not in session, they can work a maximum of eight hours per day and 40 hours per week. They are also prohibited from working in hazardous jobs, such as construction or operating heavy machinery. Children aged 16 and 17 can work longer hours and in more types of jobs, but they are still prohibited from working in hazardous occupations. They can work up to 48 hours per week when school is not in session and up to 30 hours per week during the school year.

Public Opinion

In an interview with David Sheen, a 19-year-old grocery store worker states: “Well, child labor could be a good and bad thing. It isn’t cool if they get underpaid and are exploited but if they enjoy their work and aren’t being used it should be allowed.” Sheen, who works 26 hours a week and is in college, is an advocate for equal working rights.

In another interview, with Christian O’Leary claims: “Children should be able to get their bag if they want. no government should be putting limitations on theie profession.” O’Leary is a 17-year-old with no current occupation.

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About the Contributor
John Kucel, Reporter
John Kucel is a 17-year-old Senior at Colonia High School. Kucel has an older sister and enjoys spending time with her and their family. Kucel is an advocate for calisthenics, a type of body weight exercise, and cold showers. In his free time he often is working out or playing video games. Kucel is a conservative that pushes for the truth to get out regardless of the topic. Kucel plans on going into the police force one day and hopes to have a happy family. Currently, Kucel is employed at the WCC where he has been working for a year. He plays hockey and hopes to get into track or wrestling eventually.   

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The student news site of Colonia High School
In the workforce, how young is too young