A day at The Bridge: Journalism 3 students learn video production hands-on

By: Angelina Wintonick, Co-Editor in Chief

Hang on for a minute...we're trying to find some more stories you might like.


Email This Story






The Journalism class at Colonia High School is where students learn how to write, report and interview others throughout the community and on issues they feel passionate about. Implemented into electives, as Journalism 1, 2, and 3, Mrs. Danielle Allen has created an environment where students are freely able to express themselves.

Journalism 1 and 2 is mainly learning how to report, and write articles. Journalism 3, which is in its second year, is more about broadcasting, podcasting and the cinematography side of Journalism.

Implementing Broadcasting

In the first year, Journalism 3 class focused on podcasts and learning how to broadcast journalism through auditory responses. Looking into film production, and properly reporting on air, is part of the new class that Allen creates.

For the first year of  Allen’s Journalism 3 classroom, she took her class to intern at The Bridge, Woodbridge Township’s  TV Channel’s main news show, where civilians of the township can be updated on town and school events. Students were able to see the process of preparation into taping a successful news show. Due to the encouraging workers at The Bridge, the Journalism students were able to direct many of the operations, and film segments of the show.

After such a successful day, Allen decided to ask The Bridge if her class for the 2019-2020 school year could attend another film shooting. Once again, on September 26, Journalism traveled to the Woodbridge Municipal Building to watch another filming of The Bridge.

Filming the Bridge

Students spent half of a school day watching how a typical filming day at The Bridge progressed. Starting at 9:20 AM, with the host, Darin Cerreto, reviewed his script for the show which was created by Mrs. Christina Vreeland, Supervisor of Gifted and Talented. Students were able to see how the teleprompter and cameras are used so that the director can see any shots needed. They also saw the director, Bruno Martins, as he prepared his cast for the taping.

What was very interesting though, besides the writing and filming, is the studio itself. The studio is decorated differently for every show, which is filmed 3-4 times a year. Each show has a different theme; the September 26th episode theme was “New.” In the show, Woodbridge Township Superintendent Dr. Robert Zega was interviewed as a special guest on all the “new” buildings, courses and policies implemented this school year.

Segments

The show started with the art section, which was based on Woodbridge’s new baking class. Looking at the edible artwork of a competition in Woodbridge High School bake-off, students were able to enter a competitive cupcake war. The Journalism class was able to watch and film the segment with Dr. Zega, as Mr. Cerreto asks him questions about new programs in the Township. Next, came a sports segment on the new soft lacrosse in elementary schools. Then, came a segment from John F. Kennedy Memorial High School, on the new Chromebooks in the township. And lastly, there was the music segment, with three percussionists from JFK High School, in their new percussion class.

The Journalism class, at their day at The Bridge, was able to watch Dr. Zega’s segment being filmed. They learned that much of the episode is filmed out of order and arranged in post-production. The students could see the process in deleting and re-doing many segments, and the preparation that goes into a 10 minute clip. Vreeland was nice enough tho show the process of adjusting the teleprompter while the talent is speaking. The camera people in charge of changing the angles, explained to the students how to work the camera. Martins, the director and technician of the show, flipped in between different shots, in the studio. He also spoke to the camera people via headsets.

Learning about Broadcasting

With a day at The Bridge, Journalism students were able to see real broadcasting in the making. Students could see the entire process when filming a show, from adjusting camera’s, to filming different segments at intervals. The cast and producers had a lot of preparation in order to start the show. Students could also see the speaker preparing for the show: preparing lines, be able to re-do shots as many times as the director wants, and remain focused is not an easy task.

Overall, students spent a productive day learning about real-life broadcasting. Thanks to Martins and Vreeland, students could gain an understanding of all the hard work and preparation going into filming a show, and were even able to watch it once it aired!

After the episode is filmed and edited, the students involved in the broadcast internship from Colonia High and Woodbridge High were invited to the viewing of the episode before it airs. Assistant Superintendent for Curriculum and Instruction, Mr. John  Bader attended the viewing party among other invited guests. Bader is an advocate for having the students get to a point where they can fully write, film and produce a full episode.

To work towards Bader’s dream, the Journalism 3 students will even have the opportunity to write, direct and film a segment of the next episode of The Bridge, with a new theme of “Adversity.” The episode should air in February and will include the Colonia High produced sports segment.

Tune into Woodbridge Channel 35 to see this year’s first episode of The Bridge.

Print Friendly, PDF & Email