Are AP exams worth your money?

During May and June, high school students all over the country prepare for AP testing. These tests cultivate unnecessary stress, anxiety, and depression. Considering these effects, the rising question is; are AP exams worth your money?

Photo Credit: Photo via College Board

During May and June, high school students all over the country prepare for AP testing. These tests cultivate unnecessary stress, anxiety, and depression. Considering these effects, the rising question is; are AP exams worth your money?

By: Jackie Poznanski, Editor

During May and June, high school students all over the country prepare for AP testing. These tests cultivate unnecessary stress, anxiety, and depression. Considering these effects, the rising question is: are AP exams worth your money?

The Truth about AP Classes

High school students feel the pressure to not only achieve straight A’s but, feel the need to impress colleges with AP classes. Taking AP classes comes with vigorous homework, assignments, projects, and tests. Furthermore, each student has the choice to take the AP exam at the end of the year to possibly receive college credit. While this seems straightforward, many students take these classes to boost their GPA and become exempt from the final exam. This strategy can be useful, however, is the final exam necessary to give to students?

The Exam and its Components

Depending on the exam one is taking they consist of different aspects. Although, each test is about 3 hours long and gives little to no breaks in between sections. For example, the AP Lang exams begin with a 45 question comprehension multiple-choice and ends with three essays. After the multiple-choice, the student receives a 30-minute break before the three essays. While this may seem efficient, writing three essays in a row is absolutely exhausting and draining. Considering these circumstances; are AP classes properly preparing students regarding course material and stamina?

The Credit doesn’t Always Transfer

Similarly, the credit that AP exams are known to provide isn’t always true. Most students take AP classes to obtain college credit in high school and impress prestigious colleges. However, throughout each year of high school students change their future major, college location, and goals every day. Therefore, being able to decide which AP class will be beneficial to them is near impossible.

Halle Edwards states, “The AP Program might not lead to the college credit you want for two reasons. First, AP classes often aren’t always as rigorous as their actual college equivalents, and some colleges are getting stingy about granting AP credit. Additionally, in college, your AP course doesn’t always grant you credit. Sometimes it just gets you out of your department’s intro courses—which you might want to take anyway to get a more solid understanding of the material.”

Since AP classes are becoming more common in high schools, colleges only accept the student’s credit if they score perfectly. These tests are designed to stump students and confuse them in a way that prevents them from scoring high.

Student’s are Overloading

High school is about figuring out who you are as a person and creating friendships that last forever. It’s about going on adventures and experiencing independence and freedom. These moments are once in a lifetime, therefore, before you sign up for an AP class, consider these facts and decide whether it’s worth it.

If you need a boost in your GPA, take the AP class. If you want a challenge, take the AP class. If you are extremely intrested in a subject, take the AP class.  Are you going to prepare for AP testing? Do you want to take precious time to sit home and study? Considering these effects, the rising question is; are AP exams worth your money and/or time?

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